Obituaries 1908
Submitted by Julie Coley

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > January > 2

Typhoid Fever Fatal

Sam Dodson Succumbed to Malady Yesterday Afternoon

After a long illness with typhoid fever, Sam Dodson died at the home of his father-in-law, J.A.
McSpadden, three miles north of town at 9 o'clock yesterday morning. The funeral service was
held at Burkburnett at 10 o'clock today. Mr. Dodson was only about 21 years of age and had been
married only a few months.

W.D. Brady died in this city last night after a short illness. His remains were shipped to
Durant, Okla. this afternoon for burial.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > January > 3

Obituary

On the evening of December 20th, 1907, at 4 o'clock, death took away our aged brother Mr. A.J.
Willis. He was born in Virginia May 5th, 1830, and at the time of his death was 77 years, 7
months and 15 days of age. He went from Virginia to Tennessee when a child, thence to
Jefferson, Ill., when a young man. He came to Texas July 7th, 1890 and lived in Wichita County
until the Lord took him home. He was converted while young, joined the Baptist Church and lived
a true Christian life. Brother Willis leaves a wife and nine children, who have the profound
sympathy of their many friends in the trying hours of bereavement. We laid him to rest at the
Burkburnett Cemetery at 4 o'clock December 21st, 1907. Sleep on dear brother, for we have the
assurance that you are at the home with our blessed Master, where pain and sorrow never come
and we can so live as to meet you in that home above. By one who loved this brother.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > January > 20

Death Follows Operation for Appendicitis

Word was received here this morning of the death of Miss Eva Terry, stenographer of the First
National Bank of this city, at Waxahachie Sunday morning, following an operation of
appendicitis about Wednesday of last week. Miss Terry was a young woman of splendid character
and was highly esteemed at the bank where she had been employed for some time. After an illness
of several weeks, she went to Waxahachie early last week where an operation was decided
necessary. Although it is not definitely know here when the operation was performed, it is
thought it took place about Wednesday. Further details concerning Miss Terry's death and the
arrangements for the funeral have not yet been learned here.


Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > January > 23

Death of Mr. J.M. Brown Sr.

Died at his home, 1205 Lamar avenue, Mr. James M. Brown, Sr. in January 23rd, 1908 at 1 p.m.
after an illness of only three days, with grippe, passing away without pain seemingly. He was
born in Bernard, Castle county, Durham, England on March 2nd, 1834. After growing up to young
manhood, he served seven years apprenticeship as carpenter. In about 1857 he came to America
and enlisted in a permanent company at the Carlisle barracks in Pennsylvania for a five year
term. At the end of this term he received an honorable discharge from his commanding officer.
The next few years he was in private life in Lacon, Marshall County, Illinois. In October 1866
he returned to Carlisle, Pa where he reenlisted for five more years, in Company B 4th United
States Cavalry. In December 1867 he was transferred from Carlisle, Pa to Texas, landing in
Corpus Christie and by wagon train moved his family to Camp Verda and from there to Austin,
where the Texas headquarters were located at that time. From there he was moved to Fort Concho
and in 1870 he was moved to Fort Richardson, where on the 25th day of October, 1871 he received
an honorable discharge, with this statement under the head of Character: "An excellent
uncommisioned officer and soldier. An upright and trustworthy man." After his discharge from
the army, he moved his family to Austin , Texas where he followed the carpenters trade until
1875 at which time he moved on a farm about 16 miles from Austin and in 1885 he came to the
Wichita Falls country and for the last seven years had made his home in Wichita Falls. He was a
member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church and a man whose word was his bond and one who was
held in high esteem by all who knew him. He leaves to mourn his loss his widow, Mrs. E.E. Brown
and nine children as follows: R.H. Brown, Goodnight,; W.W. Brown, J.A. Brown, J.M. Brown, Jr.,
Mrs. W.H. Bachman, Mrs. Charles F. Priebe, Mrs. Charles Doke, all of Wichita Falls, Mrs. Effie
Strom and Frank B. Brown of Denison all of whom except a son, Frank Brown of Denison were at
his bedside during his illness and death.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > February > 1

Death of Mrs. Dillard

A telegram which was received in this city who is a brother of Mrs. G.D. Anderson, announcing
the death of Mrs. J.C. Dillard, which occurred at Dr. Thompson's sanitarium in Fort Worth at 8
o'clock this morning. She was the wife of Coke Dillard who formerly resided in this city and
who is a brother of Mrs. G.D. Anderson. The latter left for Fort Worth this afternoon to attend
the funeral of his sister in law.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > February > 3

Judge A.H. Carrigan and his brother W.A. Carrigan, were called to Hope, Arkansas yesterday by a
message announcing that their sister, Annie Carrigan was at the point of death from pneumonia.
A message Saturday night announced her serious illness and another Sunday morning stated that
she was dying. Judge Carrigan and his brother left for Arkansas on the noon train and a message
received after their departure announced the death of their sister.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > February > 4

JOHN W. FIELD DEAD

Esteemed Citizen Answered Summons From Spirit World Monday Evening

FATAL ILLNESS SHORT

Was Taken Sick With Surveying Party - Brought Home and Succumbed To Typhoid Pneumonia

"John Field is dead". This simple message was repeated from friend to friend in Wichita Falls
last night and in every voice there was a deep note of sorrow, which better than words,
expressed the high esteem in which Mr. Field was held, both as a citizen and as a friend by the
people in Wichita Falls. The summons from across the river came to Mr. Field at 6:45 p.m.
Monday evening following a short illness. While his friends and family realized his critical
condition, they could not but hope until the last that his splendid useful life would be spared
and the announcement of his death was a shock for which none could be prepared. While with a
surveying party for the Wichita Falls and southern railroad of which he was chief engineer, in
the Young County coal fields, in the vicinity of True, some miles south of Olney, Mr. Field who
had not been well for some time, became so ill with what was then thought to be only an attack
of the grip that he was compelled to give up his work and return to this city, where he arrived
on the evening of January 25th, a very sick man. He was taken to the home of his son-in-law
M.J. Scovell, at 820 Indiana avenue. At that time his condition had become critical and a
complication of pneumonia and typhoid fever had developed. In the days that followed between
that time and his death, the best of medical attendance and nursing was given the patient and
at times he seemed to improve. Sunday he took a turn for the worse and Monday sank into a semi-
comatose condition, from which he never rallied, and at the close of the day, his vital
energies had been exhausted, his spirit answered the last call. John Walker Field was born
Boonville, Cooper County, Missouri, August 17, 1853. He was educated at Washington and Lee
University where he was a member of the Chi Phi fraternity. On January 15th, 1880, he was
married to Miss Gillie Russell Danled ?, a Virginia girl, who with three daughters, Mrs. M.G.
Scovell, Gillie and Suzie Field, survive his death. A sister Mrs. Fannie Gerard of Dallas was
at his bedside when death came. Mr. Field first came to Texas about thirty years ago to take
employment with the engineering department of the Texas and Pacific. Later he was an engineer
on the survey of the Fort Worth and Denver. It was while with the latter company that he first
saw Wichita Falls and later he came here to make his home about twenty six years ago. He
established himself here as a civil engineer and soon became recognized as one of the leading
men of his profession in Texas. Various enterprises in engineering work in which Mr. Field was
engaged have changed the residence of the family to other parts of the Southwest and into
Mexico at various times but after his work was finished they always have returned to Wichita
Falls. Mr. Field engineered the survey and the construction of the Wichita Valley railroad and
other roads out of this city and at the time of his death was chief engineer for the Wichita
Falls and Northwestern and the Wichita Falls and Southern railways. When the Big Pasture in
Oklahoma was opened up for settlement, Mr. Field filed for a claim and was the successful on
the quarter section of where the town of Kell is now located. Mr. Field was a man of generous
kindly disposition, of high ability in his profession and above all a man of impeachable
integrity. These qualities with a genial lovable nature and a fidelity to his friends combined
to make John Field a popular and esteemed citizen. His death cuts short a career of usefulness
a void which cannot be filled. The Funeral The funeral service was held at the residence at 820
Indiana this afternoon and was conducted by Rev. W.F. Fry, pastor of the First Baptist Church.
The body was laid to rest in the Riverside Cemetery. The pall bearers were chosen from among
those who had been friends and associates of Mr. Field for years and were as follows: R.E.
Huff, Frank Kell, J.G. Jones, C.W. Bean, Wylie Robertson, Wiley Blair, Ed H. Lysaght, Otis T.
Bacon, A.L. Richolt, and C.C. Huff. There were many beautiful floral offerings. ** Photo of
John Field is in the Feb. 5, 1908 Wichita Daily Times and the Feb. 7, 1908 Weekly Times**

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > February > 7

Dies While On Visit Here

Mrs. Daisy Boone of Greer County, Oklahoma, who was on a visit with her brother, D.W. James and
family on Scott avenue, succumbed to an attack of pneumonia, at 3 o'clock yesterday morning and
the funeral will take place today. The James family has been sorely afflicted with the
dangerous malady. Mr. James who has been seriously ill, is now improving and is believed to be
on the road to recovery. His 8 year old son, Floyd, who was also sick with pneumonia, is now
convalescent and is believed to be out of danger.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > February > 11

Death of M.A. Lowrie

M.A. Lowrie died in his home in the Frieberg neighborhood Monday evening at 8 o'clock after an
illness of about 11 days with pneumonia. Mr. Lowrie was about 36 years old and leaves a widow,
four children, a father, two brothers, one sister and a number of friends to mourn his death.
His remains will be shipped over the M. K. & T. to Belcher and interment will be made at
Montague. Mr. Lowrie had lived in the Frieberg community for only a few weeks but during that
short time and made many friends.


Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > February > 13

Thursday February 13th, at 1:35 p.m. little Mary Soule, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.A. Soule,
aged one year and twenty days. The funeral will take place from the residence at 805 Burnett
avenue Friday at 3 p.m. Rev. Dalton officiating.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > February > 15

Funeral of Barney Huntcomp

The funeral services over the remains of Barney Huntkomp who died at his home four miles north
of this city on Wednesday morning wee held in the Catholic church in this city late yesterday
afternoon, Rev. Father Dolje conducting the service, at the conclusion of which the remains
were escorted to the Catholic cemetery near the Hund place and there laid to rest. Deceased
came to this county from Missouri about one year ago and was in bad health at that time from
which he did not recover. He leaves surviving him a wife and four children, who have the
sympathy of a large circle of friends in the great misfortune which has overtaken them.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > February > 20

J.F. Wilcoxson, proprietor of a hotel in Electra, died at this place at 6:45 yesterday after an
illness with pneumonia. The deceased was a member of the local lodge of Masons and the funeral
was held under the auspices of that fraternity at Electra this afternoon. A number of Masons
from this city went to Electra this afternoon to attend the funeral. Among those who went were
J.D. Avis, Frank Collier, Milton Erwin, L.H. Lawler, J.L. Waggoner, C.M. Doke, and J.O. Smith.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > February > 22

The 19 month old child of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Niles died at their home on West Fourth street last
night, after an illness with membraneous croup. Funeral services will be conducted from the
family residence at 3 p.m. today.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > February > 24

The 14 month old baby boy of Mr. and Mrs. W.W. Coleman, after a severe attack of typhoid
pneumonia, died at the home of its parents on West Eighth street at about 10 o'clock yesterday
morning and the remains of the little child were sent to Gainesville this morning on the early
Katy train where it will be interred in the family burying ground near that city. The parents
and a few friends accompanied the corpse. Mr. and Mrs. Coleman have the sympathy of a large
number of friends in this city in the great sorrow that has come upon them.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > February > 24

Mrs. Harry Robertson received a message yesterday announcing the death of a brother at
Barbersville, Oklahoma, following an operation for appendicitis. Mrs. Robertson left this
morning for Whitewright, Texas where the funeral takes place today.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > February > 26

Death of Captain Kincade

The following from the Ardmore Morning Democrat of Feb. 21st gives an account of the death of
Capt. William L. Kincade who for a time was a resident of this city. Capt. William L. Kincade,
one of the best known and most highly respected citizens of Ardmore, dropped dead at his home
on North Washington Street last night about 7 o'clock. Capt. Kincade, though having been
afflicted with a slight heart trouble ever since the civil war, was until the time of his
death, in ordinary good health and was actively engaged in enjoying life. Last night, just
about supper time, he went to the home of a neighbor on an errand and having been gone a few
minutes longer than was his custom, one of the family went out to see what had become of him
and found him laying in the yard with life extinct. Capt. Kincade was 68 years of age at the
time of his death and had been a resident of Ardmore for the past fifteen years and only a few
days ago had purchased the Alf Wolverton property which he was making preparations to occupy on
March 1st, there to retire from active life and spend the remainder of his days. He was born in
Sumner County, Tennessee and when 12 years old moved with his parents to Bowling Green,
Kentucky where his early life was spent on a farm. At the beginning of the civil war he
enlisted in the 26th Kentucky volunteer infantry and served with distinction going at its close
to Louisville, Kentucky where he engaged in the wholesale tobacco business. He was married in
1874 to Miss Zora L. Johnson of Bowling Green and in 1881 removed to Texas coming to Ardmore in
1892. He was a consistent member of the Christian church and a charter member of Chickasaw Post
No. 18 G.A.R. In the big land opening in 1900, he drew a fine farm near Lawton and soon after,
went there and completed his filings, returning to Ardmore the first of this year. Captain
Kinkade is survived by his wife, three sons, Edward, Fred and Sheridan, the latter being
married and living in Texas: three daughters, Mrs. Ollie Scott, Celeste, Texas; Mrs. Josie
Warren, Celeste, Texas: and Mrs. Effie Sims, Gainesville, Texas. All of the absent ones were
notified of the sudden death of their father and will arrive in time for the funeral. Funeral
services will be held at the family home 508 North Washington Street tomorrow afternoon at 2:30
o'clock.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > February > 28

A Sorely Afflicted Family

The funeral of little Ruby Hackney, aged about 4 years, who died of pneumonia following an
attack of measles, was held yesterday afternoon. The Hackney family lives on North Ohio avenue.
There are about ten members of the family of whom only one was well enough to attend the
funeral of the little girl. Every member of the family is or has been ill with the measles or
pneumonia, or both. Mr. Hackney is a hard working man but he too has been sick and unable to
work and the illness of his children reduced the family almost to want.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > March > 2

DEATH OF COL. L.T. MILLER

Remains Will Be Shipped From California To This City

A telegram from Fred Miller of Chicago, to Judge A.H. Carrigan of this city on yesterday
announces the death of Mr. Miller's father, Col. L.T. Miller which occurred at his home at
Pasadena, California on Saturday night or early Sunday morning. The telegram was a request for
Judge Carrigan to make arrangements for the funeral, as the remains of Col. Miller were to be
shipped from Pasadena, California last night and will probably reach here by Wednesday noon and
will be interred at Riverside cemetery by the side of his first wife and daughter. For years
Col. Miller was a resident of this city and was known by all the old residents. He was a Union
soldier coming to Texas from Ohio. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church and while it has
not been definitely announced, those in charge of the arrangements for the funeral say the
remains will be taken from the train to the church, where a short service will be conducted
after which interment will take place. Deceased was held in high esteem in this city and all
will be sorry to learn of his death.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > March > 4

Death of Ed Pool

Ed Pool. A farmer living on Mr. Shumake's place in the Thornberry neighborhood died at about 4
o'clock yesterday morning and was buried at Thornberry yesterday afternoon. Mr. Pool was past
middle age and leaves a wife and several children. His death was caused by typhoid pneumonia.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > March > 5

Death of Mrs. Lida Clark

News reached the city today of the death of Mrs. Lida Clark, wife of Mora Clark, which occurred
at Gainesville this morning. Mrs. Charles Clark of Iowa Park left for Gainesville this
afternoon to attend the funeral which will take place tomorrow.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > March > 9

Two Sad Deaths Saturday Night

Two deaths attended by unusually sad circumstances occurred in this city Saturday night. The
first was that of Mrs. G.W. Farley, who recently came here from Stonewall, Oklahoma and the
second was that of Mrs. Farley's 10 year old sister, Lillie Duncan. Mrs. Farley's death
occurred at 7 o'clock and her sister died an hour later. The Farley family since coming here
about three weeks ago, have been living in a tent adjoining the Nichols wagon yard on Indiana
avenue. Several cases of measles broke out in the family and a short time ago, before she had
fully recovered fro the measles, Mrs. Farley gave birth to a baby and following her confinement
was seized with pneumonia, which resulted in her death Saturday night. Her sister, Lillie
Duncan, aged 10 was also stricken with pneumonia following an attach of the measles, dying in
the same tent an hour after the death of her sister. The baby still survives and two other
children of the family, who have been sick with the measles, are on the road to recovery. The
bodies of Mrs. Farley and her sister were laid to rest in the Riverside cemetery Sunday
afternoon.

Sudden Death of Dr. Carrigan

A telegram to Mrs. A.H. Carrigan from Hope, Ark, received this afternoon announced the sudden
death of Dr. S.M. Carrigan, which took place at that place at 1 p.m. this afternoon. The
telegram was from Judge Carrigan who was called to Hope, Ark. by a telegram announcing the
serious illness of his father, who is not expected to live. Dr. Carrigan is a younger brother
of Judge and W.A. Carrigan of this city and at one time was chairman of the medical board of
the State of Arkansas. He has another brother besides two in this city. Dr. P.B. Carrigan, who
is general surgeon for the Southern Pacific railway, and who is now on his way from Old Mexico
to attend the bedside of his father and sister both of whom are very sick and not expected to
live. Judge Carrigan was at Graham when the message announcing the seriousness of his father
was received on Saturday evening and left immediately for Hope, Ark. Will was in Mineral Wells
and arrived home today. He expected to join Judge Carrigan at Forth Worth and go with him to
Hope but received another telegram at that place saying that his father was some better and he
concluded to come on home but Judge Carrigan went on the Hope, Ark. And reached there about the
time his brother died.

DR. ROBERTSON DEAD

Prominent Physician Answered Deaths Summons Saturday Evening

USEFUL CAREER ENDED

Dead Physician Stood High in His Profession and Was a Big Hearted Man

Saturday evening March 7th, at 7:30 o'clock, Dr. Robert R. Robertson died at his home in this
city. The news of his death came as a shock. That he was in bad health and had been for the
past four years was well known but no one, not even the members of his own family, thought the
end was so near. Only the ___ ___ of his death ___ ____ ____ (can't read, very faint print)
Col. L.T. Miller and while at the country, grew so weak that friends had to support him to his
buggy and on reaching home he had another and more severe attack which resulted in his death as
about stated. The immediate cause of Dr. Robertson's death was hemorrhage of the stomach. He
was of the most skill and widely known physicians in Northwest Texas. Coming to Wichita Falls
in the fall of 1892 from his native state of Kentucky, it was not a great while until he had
built up a practice in his profession that should required the physical strength of two strong
and vigorous men like himself rather than one, but he rarely ever refused a summons from the
sick whether the patient was a poor or rich man. The matter of collecting his fee for a
professional visit was always secondary with him. A few years of such active work soon began to
show its effects on his health and it finally broke him down. About four years ago he came near
to losing his life and in order to save it, it became necessary to perform a very difficult
operation. After he recovered from the severe attach he determined to retire from the active
practice of his profession and only attended those patients whom he could not induce to call
other physicians. At his death he lacked only two days to being 44 years of age and leaves a
devoted wife and four small children to mourn his untimely taking off besides numerous other
relatives and a host of close friends. Besides his immediate family, deceased leaves two
sisters, Mrs. J.H. Huggins of Kell, Oklahoma and Miss Bettie Robertson of Amarillo and one
brother Mr. W.W. Robertson of this city and several nieces and nephews all of whom attended the
funeral. The funeral was held at the family residence at 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon under
the auspices of the local order of Elks which deceased had been a member only a few days. The
weather was decidedly disagreeable, but notwithstanding this, a large number of close and
personal friends came in from far and near to pay this last sad __ of respect to his memory.
The service was simple, but sad and impressive. The choir organized for this special occasion,
sang sweetly, "Rock of Ages", Some Day We'll Understand", and a solo by Mr. Kruger, "Lead
Kindly Light". At the conclusion of the funeral service at the home, the remains were escorted
to the Riverside Cemetery and there deposited in their last resting place. Messrs. J.H.
Russell, P.H. Pennington, R.B. Stayton, Henry Miller, S.Y. Ferguson and Ed Lysaght, acted as
pall bearers. In life, the deceased was a great lover of flowers and was rarely ever seen upon
our streets without a small bouquet fastened in the lapel of his coat. His friends seemed to
remember this and there were many floral offerings. Among those who sent flowers were the Elk's
Lodge, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Miller of Fruitland, Mr. and Mrs. Sullivan of Fort Worth, Mr. Chas.
Malone, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Howard, Mr. and Mrs. S.Y. Ferguson, Miss Della LaBrou, Mr. and Mrs.
R.C. Hardy, Mr. and Mrs. A.L. Huey, Mr. and Mrs. W.A. Soule, Drs. Burnside and Walker and
others. He was born in Montgomery, Trigg County, Kentucky on March 9th, 1861, was left an
orphan at the age of 12 years, chose the practice of medicine as his profession and was a
graduate of both the Louisville and Omaha medical colleges. Was married to Miss Alice Mussen at
Pineville, Ky where he practiced his profession for hour years, coming from there to this city.
The writer of this has been an intimate friend of the deceased for the past fifteen years, and
does not believe…… (this is all there was to this article, it just stops at the bottom of the
first page of the newspaper)

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > May > 7

Card of Thanks

We wish to express our sincere thanks to those who were so kind to us in the illness and at the
death of our dearly beloved mother and sister, Mrs. N.T. Evans, who departed this life May 3rd.
Though some of their faces were strange to us, their presence and assistance comforted our
bleeding hearts and filled them with gratitude inexpressible. We feel that each and everyone
one of them with us will meet our saluted mother in the beautiful city of God, where they will
be fully rewarded for their loving kindness to her in her last hours and to us in our
bereavement. May God bless them to the fullness of our desires. Mrs. Joe Dobson Mrs. E.N.
Graham

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > March > 16

Death of J.L. Young

Mr. J.L. Young, aged 81 years, died at the home of his daughter Mrs. G.J. Rohatch, two miles
south of this city, last Saturday evening and the remains of deceased were taken to Byers this
afternoon, where they will be interred in the family burying ground. The deceased has been
making his home with Mr. and Mrs. Rohatch for the past eighteen months.

The two month old infant of Eppa Cox and wife at 1710 Austin street , was discovered dead in
its bed at 5 o'clock this morning. Whether the child died from suffocation or other causes is
not positively known. The funeral service was held this afternoon. Mr. and Mrs. Cox have the
sympathy of many friends in their home.

Death of Mrs. Freeman

Mrs. A. Freeman, aged about 63 years, died last Saturday night at the country home of Mr. and
Mrs. J.B. Walker, four miles northwest of this city. Deceased was the mother of Mrs. A.B.
Crites of this city with whom she had been visiting during the winter and was on her way back
to Iowa Park to visit another daughter, when she became so ill she could not make the trip and
stopped at the Walker home for a rest. The remains were taken to Iowa Park for interment.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > March > 17

Card of Thanks

We desire to express our heartfelt thanks to our many friends who so faithfully aided and
comforted us in the loss of our dear baby, Jessie Lee.

Eppa H. Cox, Ora E. Cox - father and mother L.L. Cox, M.D. Cox, C.C. Cox - Grandparents and
Uncle

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > March > 25

Measles and Pneumonia Fatal

Ralph Brittain, aged about 3 years, the son of Mr. and Mrs. J.R. Brittain, living at 1011
Seventh street, died at 6:45 o'clock this morning after an illness with measles and pneumonia.
The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 4 o'clock. Another child in the family is
seriously ill with the measles.

Card of Thanks

To the kind friends and the physician who attended our loved one in her last illness and death,
we shall ever cherish the tender care and kind words as the only consolation kind friends can
offer in the hour of bereavement such as ours. If such misfortune should ever befall you, may
your lot be cast among people as ready to respond to your needs as you have been to ours. May
heaven's choicest blessings rest upon you all.

E.W. McBride and family G.W. Grant S.H. Grant M.D.

Death of Arthur Kiel

Arthur Kiel, the 15 year old son Louis Kiel and wife, who live about five miles northeast of
town, died at about 9 o'clock this morning, after an illness with the grip and typhoid fever.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > March > 26

A SAD ACCIDENT

Body of Young Man Killed at Dayton, Ohio Brought Here for Burial

The body of Sylvester Spurling, a young man aged 23 years, who died in a hospital in Dayton,
Ohio, Saturday night from the wound of an accidental gunshot fired by his 3 year old brother,
was buried here this morning, the funeral being from the home of the dead man's uncle J.W.
Spurling on Travis Street. The dead man was the son of Abraham Spurling, a brother to the Mr.
Spurling here, and was preparing to come to Wichita Falls with his father's family when the
fatal accident occurred. For that reason, his body was shipped here for burial. His death was
the result of an unusually sad accident. He was living on a lounge at his home when his baby
brother picked up a rifle and innocently pointing the weapon at the sleeping man, fired the
shot which caused a fatal wound.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > March > 26

Funeral of Arthur Kiel

The funeral of Arthur Kiel, the 15 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Kiel, who reside four
miles northwest of this city will take place at the Riverside Cemetery this afternoon. Arthur
attended the public schools in this city and as a mark of respect to his memory the eighth
grade pupils will march in a body from the high school building to the cemetery to attend his
funeral.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > March > 28

Death of Hiram Hodges

Hiram Hodges, one of Burkburnett's most substantial citizens, succumbed to an attack of liver
trouble at his home in that place at 2 o'clock Friday morning after an illness of about four
weeks. Mr. Hodges, at his death, lacked only a few days of being 62 years of age. He was a
native of Missouri and came to Texas about nine years ago. Two sons, James and Otto Hodges, who
live at Burkburnett, and a daughter, Mrs. Mary Heard, living in Wichita Falls, survive him. The
funeral was held yesterday afternoon and the body was laid to rest in the Nestorville Cemetery.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > April > 17

Death of Mrs. Mary Ann Fields

Mrs. Mary Jane Fields, wife of W.D. Fields, living on C. Deans farm about four miles from
Thornberry, died Wednesday afternoon, after an illness of only about two weeks with pleurisy.
Mrs. Fields was a native of Arkansas and was about 44 years old. She became a member of the
Methodist church when only 11 years old and had lived a useful consistent Christian life. She
was married 27 years ago and came to Texas with her husband about twenty two years ago. She was
the mother of a family of eleven children, all of whom survive her. Two of these children are
now very sick with malarial fever. The other surviving relatives are the husband, father, five
uncles and an aunt. The burial took place at the Thornberry cemetery after a short funeral
service conducted by Rev. E.M. Wisdom, pastor of the Methodist Church at Frieberg.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > April > 20

CO-INCIDENTS IN DEATH

Clifford Manley and Stephen Povilaiki Found Dead at Almost Same Hour in Rooming Houses

Clifford E. Manley, the property man and electrician with the Hollingsworth and Twins show, and
Stephen Povilaiken, a young man of Waterbury, Connecticut, who arrived here a few days ago in
search of health, died sudden and unexpectedly in this city Saturday evening. By a queer
coincidence, both at the same time of their deaths were occupying rooms in houses built of
cement blocks and the landlords in both instances were named Davis. Povilaika was found dead in
his bed at the Block rooming house run by J.M. Davis near the Fort Worth and Denver Depot at
about 10 o'clock Saturday night. According to the testimony of Mr. Davis, Povilaika arrived in
Wichita Falls only two or three days ago and appeared in feeble health and had his meals sent
to his room. Povilaika told Mr. Davis that he was a sufferer from stomach trouble and that he
was in search of health. He seemed worse Saturday and when Mr. Davis went to his room to see
how he was getting along about 10 o'clock, he found Povilaiki dead in his bed. Coroner Brothers
was immediately and while he was examining the body of Povilaiki, he received a telephone
summons to come to the rooming house conducted by Mrs. Harry Davis on Indiana avenue where
Clifford E. Manley had just been discovered lying dead on the floor of the hallway. The body of
Manley was discovered about 11 o'clock about half an hour after he had retired to his room. The
body was lying in a doorway to a bathroom which he had evidently been leaving when he fell dead
out into the hallway. As he fell it is evident that Manley clutched the electric light bulb in
the hallway just outside the bathroom door for the wire had been torn from its fastenings in
the ceiling and was lying across his body. Dr. Walker who made an examination of the body
believes that Manley died during a convulsion due to acute congestion of the stomach. He said
that shortly before retiring the dead man had eaten several hard boiled eggs, and as his
companions say that he had suffered with convulsions on several previous occasions, that there
was but little doubt that this was the cause of his death. Manley's home was said to have been
at Moberly, Missouri but as far as is known, he had no relatives. He joined the show at El
Paso, Texas about thirteen months ago and had been with the company since that time. He was
about thirty five years old and his companions speak of him as a generous, good hearted,
temperate fellow, who was well liked by all. He was buried here yesterday afternoon, the show
company defraying the expense of his funeral in a decent manner. On the body of Povilalki was
found a telegram from Anthony Polilaiki, from Anson Connecticut, saying that the sender was
forwarding money by mail. This was about all that gave any clue to the man's identity and his
body was removed to Jackson Brother's morgue where it was embalmed. A telegram was sent to
Anson notifying relatives of the man's death and an answer received today directed that the
body be buried here. * Note from transcriber - Polilaiki's name was spelled 5 different ways in
this article!

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > April > 23

Death of Mrs. Charles Glenn

Mrs. Charles Glenn aged about 35 years, died at her home near Bacon station north of town at 5
o'clock this morning. Her husband and six children survive her death. The funeral will be held
at the Nestorville cemetery near Burkburnett, at one o'clock this afternoon.

Death of Mrs. J.M. Roberts

News coming to town just as the Times is going to press of the death of Mrs. J.M. Roberts, wife
of Tom Roberts who resides four and one half miles north of town. She was a consumptive and had
been a long sufferer from the disease. At this writing it is not known what arrangements have
been made for the funeral.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > April > 24

Death of Mrs.Elizabeth Utley

Mrs. Elizabeth Utley, aged about 45 years, died at her home on the Hillburn place, about three
miles north of town at 6 o'clock Wednesday morning from heart failure. Mrs. Utley had not been
in good health for some time but had not been confined to her bed and a short time before her
death had eaten a hearty meal. A husband and two children survive her death. The funeral was
held Thursday afternoon and the body was laid to rest in the Riverside Cemetery.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > April > 25

C.W. Butler is being at the point of death at the home of his brother in law Burt Bean, in this
city. For over forty eight hours, Mr. Butler has been unconscious and there is now hope that he
can survive.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > April > 27

Charles Butler Dead

Charles W. Butler after weeks of sickness and suffering passed into eternity at the home of his
brother in law Burt Bean in this city at 9:15 o'clock Sunday night. On the 4th of March, Mr.
Butler's home near the city caught afire and was partially burned. In fighting the fire and
taking his household goods from the building Mr. Butler became ill from excitement and
overexertion which brought on heart trouble. In the weeks that passed, Mr. Butler made a brave
fight for life, but about a week ago, after apparently being much better, the patient grew
worse and for several days had been gradually sinking towards the last sleep. Mr. Butler was
born in Jackson, Michigan, October 15, 1871. He was married to Miss Nina Bean Dec. 2, 1902, who
with one child, a boy aged 3 years survive him. Last September, Mr. Butler and his family,
moved to this place where he engaged in farming near this city. The funeral will take place at
the residence of B.J. Bean at 1 o'clock this afternoon and will be conducted by Rev. J.A.
Stafford, pastor of the Tenth street Methodist Church.

Lucy Spence Roberts

Lucy Spence Roberts was born near Waco, McLennan County, September 18, 1858 and died at her
home about five miles northeast of Wichita Falls on Thursday at 12:20 p.m. April 28, 1908, aged
49 years, 7 months and 6 days. For 12 years she had been a patient sufferer of that dread
disease, consumption and for the past six weeks had been lying at the point of death. Though
loving hands have administered to her every want, it was all to no avail. On October 18, 1878,
she was united in marriage to Mr. J.M. Roberts and to this union were born nine children, all
of whom are living. They are as follows: Roxie, Iola Tarwater of this city, Lula Goble of
Waxahachie, Guy, Edgar, Charlie, Ethel, Carrie and Annie. Having moved to their present home 23
years ago, she was really one of the pioneers of this country, and has endured many of the
hardships incident to the life of the early settler. She has long been a member of the
Methodist Church and Rev. Farley had charge of the services, which were held Friday afternoon
from the home.

Death of Mrs. J.B. Morris

Mrs. J.B. Morris, a former resident of this city, died at her home in Henrietta at 9 o'clock
yesterday morning, after an illness with lung trouble. Mrs. Morris was about 35 years old and
was well known here where her husband was manager of Robertson's drug store for several years.
Mr. Morris is now manager of the Malone Morris light plant at Henrietta and Charles Malone of
this city was called to Henrietta yesterday on account of her death. The remains were shipped
yesterday afternoon to Hope, Arkansas for burial.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > April > 29

Death of J.K.P. Carter

J.K.P. Carter, one of the pioneer residents of Wichita Falls, passed into eternal rest at 5:30
o'clock last night, his death occurring at his home on Ohio avenue following many months of
illness as the result of paralysis. The deceased suffered his first paralytic stroke several
years ago and had been almost helpless during the past twelve months. Mr. Carter, if he had
lived would have been 53 years old next month. He was a native of South Carolina and came to
Wichita Falls 28 years ago and for many years ran a barber shop. He is survived by a widow and
five sons, Fred, William, Robert, Ross and Raymond, all of whom live in this city. The funeral
took place from the family residence at 1100 Ohio avenue at 3 o'clock this afternoon, Rev. J.R.
Bowles officiating. The remains were laid to rest at Riverside Cemetery.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > May > 4

The six month old infant of Marion Overturf and wife, living on Lee street, died Saturday night
and was buried in the Riverside cemetery yesterday afternoon. Rev. W.F. Fry officiating at the
funeral.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > May > 8

Funeral of Mrs. Giles

The remains of Mrs. Frank Giles, who died in a hospital in Dallas yesterday reached here this
afternoon and was met at the Denver Depot by a ___ of friends of the family and ___ to
Riverside cemetery where interment took place. The family formerly resided in this ___, Mr.
Giles being a plumber by trade. From here the family moved to Gainesville and Mrs. Giles
becoming ill was taken to Dallas was taken to Dallas to have an operation performed in the ___
of saving her life with the ___ above stated.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > May > 11

Carroll, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. John W. Taylor, died in this city yesterday morning of
measles. Funeral services were conducted from the family residence at 10 o'clock this morning.
The parents have the sympathy of many friends in the loss of their little child.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > May > 14

Walter Parker is Dead

One of Wichita County's Wealthiest Farmers Passed Away This Morning

C.H. Vanhorn and E.E. Heiserman came to town this morning from near Iowa Park to purchase a
casket for Walter Parker, who died at his home five miles northeast of Iowa Park at 3:30 this
morning, his death being caused by a complication of diseases, from which the deceased had been
a sufferer for the past four months. At his death, Mr. Parker was in his 64th year. He was one
of the oldest settlers of Wichita County and was one of the few men who took a prominent part
in the organization of the county. He was well known throughout this section of the state and
accumulated by hard work an estate which is now estimated at a fair valuation between $75,000
and $100,000. The greater portion of his holdings is in real estate and stock and most of it is
located in Wichita County. The tax rolls of the county for the past several years shows Mr.
Parker was the largest individual tax payer in the county his property being assessed at about
$10, 000. Funeral services will take place from the Parker home at 1 o'clock tomorrow
afternoon. The remains will be interred at the Iowa Park Cemetery.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > May > 19

CHILD SHOOTS SELF

Five Year Old Ottie Prince is Killed While Plying With a Revolver

DEATH INSTANTANEOUS

Little Boy Finds Weapon Between the Mattresses - Places Muzzle in Mouth and Pulls the Trigger

While playing with a loaded revolver which he had discovered between the mattresses of a bed in
his mother's room, the 5 year old son of E.F. Prince and wife living across the irrigation
ditch from the Farmer's Union Cotton Gin, placed the muzzle of the weapon in his mouth and
pulled the trigger with the result that he was killed instantly. The accident occurred about
7:30 o'clock last night. The mother had been at work in a garden at the rear of the house and
had stopped at the back porch where she had stopped to rest and talk to a neighbor Mrs. S.A.
Morrison. Suddenly a revolver shot rang out from inside the house and with fear in her heart
Mrs. Prince rushed into the house to find her boy laying dead upon the floor, with a stream of
crimson flowing from his lips. The bullet from the 44 Colt had passed upward through the
child's mouth tearing a hole through his brain and coming out at the back of his skull near the
top of his head. Death had been instantaneous. The grief of the mother was pitiful and vainly
did she try to convince herself that her child was not dead. The little boy was an unusually
bright and happy child and was a favorite in the neighborhood and as rapidly of the news of the
accident spread neighbors came to offer help and consolation. Coroner Brothers was summoned and
made an examination of the body, convincing him that they child had come to his death
accidentally of playing with the revolver of which in his innocence, he did not know anything
concerning its deadly character. The father of the boy is an engineer on the Fort Worth and
Denver and was at Childress when notified of the accident. He returned at once to this city.
The funeral service will be held at 4 o'clock this afternoon from the family home near Grandma
Dodge's residence. Rev. J.A. Stafford will officiate.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > May > 20

Will Marlow Killed

Message from Weinert Reports the Death of Brother of J.B. Marlow

J.B. Marlow, the real estate man, received a telephone message from Weinert, a town on the
Wichita Valley railroad, this afternoon, conveying the sad news of the death of his brother,
Will Marlow, at that place this morning. His death resulted from being kicked by a horse, but
further details were not learned. The deceased was about ? years old and was well known in
Wichita Falls where he lived until a few years ago. He was a live stock man and was married
only about two months ago. His remains will probably be brought to this city for burial. J.B.
Marlow and sister, Mrs. J.A. Morris, who is visiting here from Mexico, and Mrs. E L. Napier,
the mother of the deceased, left for Weinert this afternoon.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > May > 21

The floral offerings for the funeral of Will Marlow were shipped here from Fort Worth this
afternoon and were taken to Munday by A.L. Huey and Myles O'Reilly. The floral pieces were very
beautiful. One of the pieces was made in a Masonic design. The funeral at Munday this afternoon
was held under the auspices of the Masonic fraternity.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > May > 22

Death of Mrs. B.V. Parks

Mrs. B.V. Parks, aged about 30 years, wife of Engineer Parks, died at her home at the corner of
Ninth street and Scott avenue at about noon yesterday following an illness with fever and this
afternoon her body was shipped to Kansas City for burial. The husband and infant child survive
her.

Card of Thanks

To our friends and neighbor who so kindly aided us during the illness and at the death of our
dear little baby, we wish to extend our heartfelt gratitude and thanks. Mr. and Mrs. John W.
Taylor

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > May > 25

DROWNS IN A TANK

ROY Shofe, Aged 10, Lost Life at McKinley's Tank Sunday Afternoon

Was Wading After Fish When He Stepped Into Deep Hole and Was Drowned

Roy Shofe, the 10 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. J,N, Shofe, living about two miles southwest of
town, was drowned in what is known as McKinley's tank at about half past three o'clock Sunday
afternoon. The Shofe boy, in company with John Wildermuth, a 12 year old companion, had gone
over to the tank to look at the high water. While standing on the bank the boys saw a large
fish which had com up into the shallow water near the shore. Exclaiming that he would catch the
fish for his father's supper, Roy waded into the water and as the fish darted away, he started
in pursuit having no thought of danger. A few feet from the shore there is a sudden set off in
the bottom of the tank, in which the water yesterday was about seven feet deep. The boy eager
in his pursuit of the fish plunged into the deep water before he knew his danger and sank
immediately. His young companion, who could not swim, waded out to the edge of the set off and
made futile efforts to reach the drowning boy as he rose and sank three times. Finding that his
efforts at rescue were vain, the Wildermuth boy ran to the Shofe home with his sad message for
help. Within a few minutes the rescuers were on the bank and Oscar Shofe an older brother of
the drowned boy, dived into the tank and brought out the body. Efforts were made to resuscitate
life, but the rescuers were too late. Dr. Coons arrived shortly afterward and upon examination
found that life was extinct. The body was then removed to the Shofe home where the funeral
services will take place at 3 o'clock. Rev. Dalton will be officiating.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > June > 3

Man Meets Death in Storm

Burkburnett, Tex. - June 3 - in the storm which swept over Burkburnett and the surrounding
country about 7:30 o'clock last night, James Patton, who lived on Mr. Brandon's farm about 4
and one half miles west of this place, met his death. Mr. Patton who was about 63 years of age,
lived in a house located about thirty or forty feet from the house occupied by the Brandon
family and as the storm approached he assisted the Brandon's to get into a dug out near the
house, but having recently sustained a broken arm, which he did not wish to get wet, he decided
to return to his own house, thinking that there was no great danger from the storm. Just as he
reached his house the storm struck and the house occupied by Patton was completely demolished.
Patton's body was found beneath the ruins and it is believed that he was instantly killed by
the house blowing over on him just as he was about to enter the door. The victim was a native
of Alabama and came to Burkburnett last September and had since lived on the Brandon place. So
far as is known, he had no relatives in this section. No other houses were damaged by the
storm, as far as has been reported. The wind was heavy at this place and some damage was done
to crops. The Red River, already very high, is rising and will soon be higher than at any time
during the recent floods.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > June > 5

Card of Thanks

To those who so kindly rendered aid and assistance during the illness and after the death of
our little darling, Liddie Florence, we desire in this manner to publicly acknowledge our
heartfelt thanks and gratitude. Their many kind acts have placed us under obligations which it
will be impossible to discharge, but which will ever be remembered by us. Mr. and Mrs. Geo.
Vandvier Mrs. L.A. Vandvier Mrs. Martha Worden

Death of Henry Hendricks

Died at his home in this city, 1011 Indiana avenue, at 2 o'clock this afternoon of typhoid
pneumonia, Henry Hendricks, aged 22 years. Mr. Hendricks had only been sick a short time and
his death came very suddenly and was quite a shock to his family and friends. Mr. Hendricks was
just entering into manhood and had bright prospects for a useful like when death claimed him.
He leaves a wife and two children, his mother, Mrs. John Prang and other relatives to mourn his
loss. He was a member of the W.O.W. lodge at Denison and will be buried in this city as soon as
relatives arrive here from Denison.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > June > 6

Succumbed to Typhoid Fever

W.J. Cook, the man who was brought to this city from Byers Thursday and placed in the Wichita
Falls Sanitarium for treatment died yesterday afternoon at 5 o'clock and the body was buried at
Riverside Cemetery this morning. He was a victim of typhoid fever and was in a dying condition
when brought to the sanitarium for treatment having been sick for fifteen or twenty days.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > June > 22

Death of L.B. McMurtry

The death of L.B. McMurtry one of Wichita Falls oldest citizens, occurred at 6:30 yesterday
morning at the home of his daughter Mrs. D.W. Harcrow of Fort Worth. While it was known the
deceased was in bad health, and had gone to Fort Worth to be treated by a specialist, the
announcement of his death comes as a surprise. The remains reached the city at 1:30 this
afternoon, and were convoyed to the home of the deceased. Corner of Ninth and Bluff streets,
where funeral services were conducted by Rev. J.J. Dalton, pastor of the Presbyterian Church,
at the conclusion of which the Masonic Lodge of which deceased was a member, took charge of the
remains and escorted them to Riverside cemetery where they were deposited in their last resting
place with all the honors that could be conferred by that order. There were many floral
offerings and other evidences of the respect and esteemed in which the deceased was held by
those who knew him best. At his death, the deceased was in his 68th year, and was an old
confederate soldier. He came to Texas from Missouri and settled in Wichita Falls about 25 years
ago. In the early days of the county, he was a prominent and quite well to do cattleman, but
met with reverses. Later, or in 1896, he was elected Sheriff and tax collector of Wichita
County and served for four years or two terms in that capacity. Since going out of office he
again embarked in the business of buying and selling cattle. He leaves surviving him a loving
and devoted wife, who was at his bedside at his death, and two daughters, Mrs. D.W. Harcrow of
Fort Worth and Mrs. J.W. Houston of Salt Lake City. A telegram from Mr. Houston to a friend in
this city announced that it would be impossible for him and his reach to reach here in time for
the funeral.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > June > 23

Lee McMurtry in Last Sleep

Fought With Quantrell and Jesse James Dies Here

Fort Worth Telegram:

Lee B. McMurtry, 66 years old, died Sunday in Ft. Worth and with his passing of one of the most
remarkable characters of the early days of the southwest goes to its final reward. McMurtry was
a personal friend and long time associate of Jesse James in the days of his career in Missouri.
He has told many listeners how he was with Bill Quantrell when he was shot toward the close of
the civil war and last fall at Wichita Falls met Cole Younger for the first time in 36 years.
McMurtry was present at the famous massacre at Lawrence, Kansas when the entire city was shot
up and burned. Once with a few comrades when surrounded by Colorado troops he cut his way
through the military cordon and in his flight that day had three horses shot from under him.
When the James boys were broken up he fled to Mexico and later returned to New Mexico. Here he
freighted for years, but later returned and stood trial, coming clear of all charges made
against him.

MADE A FINE SHERIFF

Next he appears as peace officer and was made sheriff of Wichita county. At Wichita Falls he
made the best sheriff thereabouts had ever known. He was absolutely fearless and enforced the
law to the letter. It is told of him that when a member of the Quantrell guerilla band during
the civil war he once saved the life of the now Senator Stephen B. Elkins, who was a school boy
friend of his. McMurtry who case his lot with the Quantrell band, often told how he came to
join that organization. The company he always explained was raised of fearless and daring men
on the frontier who were accustomed to ride and shoot and was intended as a light horse
attachment of the Confederate army. Their recklessness led them into trouble with the leaders
of the Confederacy and before they were aware if it they were declared outlaws and the hands of
both the federal and the Confederate governments were against them. "I fought under the black
flag for two years", said McMurtry to a Telegram reporter last fall at Wichita Falls, "And I
tell you it's a might dangerous business."

$10,000 REWARD OFFERED FOR HIM

At one time the United States government placed a reward of $10,000 upon McMurtry's head. That
was in the days directly following the civil war and when the James gang was raiding through
Missouri and Kansas. His home was in Clay county Missouri. Last fall when Cole Younger started
out with his show company the meeting of the two men at Wichita Falls was touching. Younger had
only a short time before been released from a long term in the penitentiary as a result of his
many expeditions in the early days of bandit operations. The two men recognized each other
after a separation of thirty six years and Younger was taken to McMurtry's home, where they
spent hours in telling their reminiscences of the days when the only law was the law of the
gun. The death of McMurtry came very suddenly Sunday. He was visiting at the home of his
daughter in this city at 1514 Lawrence avenue when he was suddenly stricken and died.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > June > 23

Death of Baby Pink Huggins

I.W. Gullahorn received a telegram from his son in law T.H. Huggins at Amarillo announcing the
sad news of the death of the latter's eighteen month old daughter and the granddaughter of Mr.
Gullahorn, Baby Pink at 6 a.m. today. The parents will come down on No. 8 tonight with the body
and the funeral will be held here tomorrow. The child had been sick only a few days.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > June > 24

The 11 month old child of Mr. and Mrs. C.C. Brown, living near Charlie, died early this
morning. No particulars concerning the funeral could be learned.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > June > 29

Death of Miss McCall

Died at the home of her parents four miles east of the city yesterday afternoon, Miss Ida May
McCall, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J.E. McCall aged about 20 years. Her death was caused by
typhoid fever. The remains were interred at Riverside Cemetery near this city at 4:30 this
afternoon, Rev. W.F. Fry pastor of the First Baptist Church officiating. The family have the
sympathy of many friends in this city and the surrounding country in the great loss they have
sustained.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > July > 7

Regarding the Late Mr. McMurtry

The following is a true biographical sketch of the late L.B. McMurtry of whom such an erroneous
statement was published upon his death, stating "he was with the James boys in their outlaw
days and fleeing into old Mexico and a price being placed on his head later, returned, stood
trial and was cleared." He was never guilty of having to be brought to the bar of justice in
answer for a crime of any kind. Levi Boon McMurtry was born in Calloway county, Missouri
September 25, 1841. He was educated at ? Missouri, leaving school when 17 years of age. His
first employment was in the freighting business as a driver of a mule team, and he continued at
this business until the outbreak of the civil war in 1861. With his brothers, he entered the
Confederate service and was with Quantrell and other leaders principally in the States of
Kansas, Missouri and Arkansas, but was transferred to the eastern side of the Mississippi river
in the last year of the war and was in Nelson county, Kentucky when hostilities ceased.
Returning to his western home he shortly afterward moved to Las Vegas, N.M. where he was
engaged in merchandising for the next two years. In this he prospered, but close his business
out and again returned to his native State and located in Jackson county where he began
handling cattle and continued until 1871 when he came down to the Choctaw nation continuing in
the same business and prospering. In 1883 he moved to Wichita Falls, Texas, Wichita county,
where he resided and engaged in the cattle business until his death, which occurred June 21,
1908, while at his daughter's in Fort Worth. He was sheriff of Wichita county four years. He
was a Royal Arch Mason and a member of Wichita Lodge No. 202. On January 8, 1867, he was united
in marriage to Catherine H. Burns at Independence, Mo. To this union three children were born -
Grizzelle, Cosette and Avon. He is survived by his wife and his daughters, Grizzelle, now Mrs.
J.W. Houston, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Avon, now Mrs. D.W. Harcrow, Fort Worth. D.W.H.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > July > 1

FALL CAUSED DEATH

Tom Dixon Sustained Fatal Injuries In Fall From Second Story Window

LANDED ON CEMENT WALK

Accident Occurred About Midnight and Death Followed This Morning

Thomas L. Dixon, a real estate man living in a room in the Guggenheim building at the corner of
Seventh street and Indiana avenue, died at 10 o'clock this morning from injuries received in a
fall from a second story window in the building where his death occurred. The accident occurred
shortly after midnight last night. It appears that Mr. Dixon was sitting in a window at the
head of the hall, opening into a passage way between the Gugehheim building and that occupied
by Stampfli's bakery, to enjoy the cool breeze that blew through the hall and fell asleep.
Myles O'Reilly who rooms in the same building observed Dixon sitting in the window when he went
to his room at about midnight and spoke to him. At that time Dixon was awake. A few minutes
later Mr. O'Reilly heard the rattle of a piece of screen which was nailed into the lower part
of the window frame and upon going out to see what was the matter discovered that Mr. Dixon was
no longer sitting in the window. Alarmed at Dixon's disappearance he run to the window to
discover that Dixon had fallen from the window to the cement pavement more than twenty feet
below. The injured man was carried to his room and physicians summoned at once. In his fall he
had landed upon his head and shoulders and sustained internal injuries which resulted in his
death this morning. The deceased was about 42 years of age and had been a resident of Wichita
Falls since 1889. The immediate surviving relatives are his father J.B. Dixon, one brother J.F.
Dixon and three sisters, Mrs. E. A Haley, Mrs. C.H. Smith and Miss Ella Dixon. The funeral will
take place at the home of his sister, Mrs. C.H. Smith at 607 North Scott avenue at four o'clock
tomorrow afternoon.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > July > 8

Card of Thanks To our many dear friends and neighbors who so kindly assisted us during the last
days of our darling baby (Jeannette's) illness and to each and giver of flowers and to the
singers we wish to express our heartfelt thanks. May God's blessings rest upon them all. Ed
Tarwater and Family

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > July > 13

Mr. and Mrs. J.F. Mendoza desire to express their appreciation for the kindness and sympathy
shown them up the death of their little daughter, who died in July 3rd, from a combined attack
of appendicitis and slow fever.


Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > July > 20

Doctor Says Hydrophobia Did Not Cause Death

Clarence Evans, the six year old son of W.P. Evans, living on Lamar street near the court
house, died at about six o'clock Sunday morning after an illness of several weeks. Several
weeks ago the child was bitten on the arm by a bull dog belonging to a neighbor and a severe
wound was inflicted. This fact was foundation for the rumor that hydrophobia was the cause of
the little boy's death but Dr. Coons who attended the case says that death was not caused by
hydrophobia. The remains were shipped to East Texas yesterday afternoon for burial.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > July > 21

Obituary Mr. T.L. Dixon, age 42 years, 5 months and 2 days departed this life July 1st, 1908.
Coming here with his parents in 1889 from Tennessee. Identifying himself with the interest of
his adopted home. He lived a faithful citizen and following the instructions given by his
religious parents, lived an honest upright life. Charity being the keynote to his actions, and
the governing rule of his life was, "do unto others as you would have them do unto you." His
unselfish nature to respect the rights of others attracted many friends. He was a dutiful son,
a loving brother and a true friend. He leaves a number of relatives to mourn his untimely
death. A Friend


Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > July > 27

Death of an infant

Aubrey, an infant son of Mr. and Mrs. John Little, died at the home of its parents in this city
this morning at 10:45. The family reside near the Denver roundhouse, and funeral services will
be conducted from the family residence at 2:30 p.m. tomorrow.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > July > 27

Mr. E.J. Nicholson, the young man who came on a visit to his sister, Mrs. W.F. Jourdan, a few
days since is very low with typhoid fever at the Wichita Falls sanitarium. Mr. Nicholson
contracted the fever in Mississippi and became worse after reaching here. He remained at the
home of his sister two works and then he and the family decided it was best for him to go to
the sanitarium under a trained nurse.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > July > 28

Succumbs to Typhoid

Ellis J. Nicholson, a young lawyer, who came to this city about three weeks ago from Temple,
Texas, with a view of locating, died at the Wichita Falls Sanitarium at 5:30 this morning from
an attack of typhoid fever. Deceased was a brother to Mrs. W.F. Jourdan of this city.
Immediately on arriving here he was taken with fever and continued to grow worse daily. On the
advice of the family physician he was removed from the residence of his sister to the Wichita
Sanitarium, in order to secure the attention of a trained nurse, but he continued to grow worse
and the end came this morning, as about stated. Mr. Nicholson was a native of Mississippi, be
he had resided in Texas for seventeen years, coming fro Temple to this city. He was a graduate
of the law department of Cumberland University of Lebanon, Tennessee. At his death he was 28
years, 5 months and 10 days of age. Funeral services will be conducted from the family
residence, 1627 Tenth street at 5 o'clock this afternoon by Rev. J.A. Stafford, pastor of the
Methodist church South, after which the remains will be laid to rest in Riverside Cemetery. Mr.
Nicholson graduated from the Lebanon law school on June 4th, 1908, with the highest honors in a
class of 76 men; was president of the Texas club of that school, and represented his society in
the intercollegiate debating contest. He was also valedictorian of his class.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > July > 29

Death of G.C. Hickman

G.C. Hickman, aged about 49 years, died at his home on J.D. Avis' ranch about 10 miles from
town yesterday after an illness with appendicitis. He leaves a wife and two children. he
funeral took place at the White Hill cemetery this afternoon.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > July > 30

Family of J.E. McCall Afflicted With Fever

Mrs. J.E McCall died Tuesday evening at her home on the Clay and Wichita County line about four
miles east of town, after an illness with typhoid fever. The funeral service was held at the
Baptist church at about half past three o'clock on Wednesday afternoon, the service being
conducted by Rev. T.R. Bowles. The body was laid to rest in Riverside cemetery, beside the
grave of her daughter, who died just a month ago from the same malady. Mr. McCall's family has
been sorely afflicted by the fever, and three sons are now reported bedfast, tow of them being
seriously ill.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > August > 4

News Notes From Allendale

Special to the Times. Allendale, Tex. Aug. 3 - Last Thursday afternoon at 4 o'clock, Janie, the
12 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Smith, died after a long illness with typhoid
fever. She had been sick over a month and was very low all the week preceding her death. She
was buried at Holliday Friday afternoon, Rev. O.J. Haroson conducting the services. A large
crowd gathered at the cemetery to pay their last respects, and to cover her grave with flowers.
She leaves a father and mother, a brother and three sisters, who have the deepest sympathy of
the entire neighborhood in their great loss. The last song little Janie ever sang was when just
before consciousness left her she sang, When the Battle's Over We Shall Wear a Crown." Now the
battle is over and she is wearing that crown. Thus God has seen fit in his infinite mercy to
pluck from our midst one of the sweetest of flowers to transplant in His garden in heaven.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > August > 5

BUSINESS MAN DEAD

E.B. Stonecipher Succumbed From Hemorrhage Of The Brain Last Night

HE BECAME OVER HEATED

While Working at His Coal Office and Was Taken to His Home Where He Died Before Midnight

The death of Mr. E.B. Stonecipher, which occurred last night at 11:30 o'clock at his home on
the corner of Thirteenth street and Burnett avenue, was a great surprise to those who knew him,
and were acquainted with his habits. As had been his custom, he was at his place of business
yesterday up to 5 o'clock when he was suddenly stricken with what the family physician said was
a hemorrhage of the brain, which rendered him unconscious a short time after the attack came
on, and in that condition he was taken to he home by friends, where he expired as above stated.
Before the attack came on him Mr. Stonecipher, who is engaged in the coal business and has his
office on the alley at the rear of the Farmer's Bank and Trust Company, was engaged in work of
some kind on the wagon scales. While at work, some one came to his office to transact a
business matter, and as Mr. Stonecipher was looking over the paper presented, he complained
that something was the matter with him, as he could not raise his right arm, and sat down in a
chair, requesting the gentlemen to get something which Mr. Stonecipher thought would relieve
him. This was done as quickly as possible, but he soon lost consciousness and was carried to
his home. Dr. Miller said to a reporter of this paper that he had been treating Mr. Stonecipher
for his trouble for three or four months, guarding against, as well as possible an attack of
the nature which caused his death. In the doctor's opinion, Mr. Stonecipher was overcome by
heat, which brought on a hemorrhage of the brain. The deceased was about 55 years of age and
was a native of Illinois, coming to this city from Cleburne, Texas, with his family in 1891,
and has ever since that time been engaged in business in this city. He leaves surviving him two
daughters, Misses Maude and Katie and one son, Mr. Everett Stonecipher. Funeral services are to
be conducted from the family residence by Rev. W.F. Fry, pastor of the First Baptist church, at
5 o'clock this afternoon, at the conclusion of which the remains will be taken in charge by the
I.O.O.F. lodge and laid to rest in Riverside cemetery by the side of his wife, with all the
honors that can be conferred by the order on a deceased brother.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > August > 10

Death of James L. Shumake

James L. Shumake, the young man who sustained a fracture of his spinal column early last fall
by a bale of cotton falling on him, died at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C.J. Shumake
near Thornberry on Saturday night, the 8th, and his remains were laid to rest in the family
burying ground at Thornberry yesterday evening. Since the time he sustained his injury every
aid known to medical and surgical skill had been resorted to relieve and if possible, restore
him to his former good health, and only a short time ago he was brought back from Chicago where
he had been taken by his mother and placed under the care of a well known surgeon. On his
return he seemed greatly encouraged, and to all appearances had made great improvement,
therefore the announcement of his death came as a surprise to his numerous friends in this
city. He was about 25 years of age, and at the time he received his injury was an industrious
farmer in the Thornberry community. The Times joins with other friends of the family in this
city in extending sympathy in the time of their great sorrow.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > August > 12

Obituary

At the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C.J. Shumake, near Thornberry, at 10 o'clock Saturday
night James L. Shumake passed peacefully away. The deceased was born February 17, 1886 near
Austin, and came to this community when a small boy and lived here continuously until the time
of his demise. As a child he was the favorite of his companions always happy and bright. As a
youth, he was honorable and industrious, and when trials came, Jim met with them with a smile
and an indomitable energy, this giving early promise of the grand and noble manhood which has
been so greatly admired by all who knew him. He was married September 20, 1896 to Miss Pearl
Bunger, who was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bunger of this community. After a few months
she was taken from him by death, on April 18, 1907, but notwithstanding the fact that the
greatest of trials had come upon him, he was still that cheerful and happy disposition and it
was only given to those who were nearest in sympathy with him to know the utter desolation of
his heart. On November 9, 1907, he received the injury which caused his death. He has been upon
the bed of affliction ever since. His wonderful physique and sweet Christian fortitude bore him
through sufferings that would have overcome many, and even to the very end he was cheerful and
happy, with a smile and a pleasant word for all. He was happy in spite of his affliction and
enjoyed life with his loved ones but realized for some time before death that he could not live
long, and in conversation with his father and friends he said that all was well with him, that
death and the grave had no terrors for him and in his last hours, though his sufferings were
intense, his whole thought seemed to center in one desire to cheer the sorrow in loved ones,
ever meeting their gaze with a loving smile. He died as he had lived, with a happy face. A
FRIEND

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > August > 15

The funeral of S.C. Rucks will be held at the residence of the deceased at the Rucks Hotel on
Eighth street at 2:30 o'clock Sunday afternoon, after which the body will be laid to rest in
Riverside cemetery.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > August > 19

THREE DEATHS IN ONE FAMILY

All victims of typhoid fever - Fourth Member of Family Seriously Ill

Eddie McCall, son of J.E. McCall died at the home of his father about six miles east of the
city yesterday and was buried in Riverside cemetery this city this morning. This is the third
death in the McCall family within the past six weeks all from the same cause-typhoid fever. A
daughter was the first to be taken, which was followed by that of the mother, and then the
young man about 15 years of age. The Times understands that another member of the same family
is down ___ ___ and is not expected to live.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > August > 17

Frank Tuttle Daugherty

Frank T. Daugherty for nearly twenty years editor of the Wichita Herald and one of the ablest
and best known newspaper men of Northwest Texas, died at his home on Eleventh street in this
city at about noon Sunday, as the result of paralytic troubles, which first afflicted him
nearly five years ago and which for more than a year past had rendered him completely helpless.
F.T. Daugherty was one of the pioneer residents of Wichita Falls, holding a position in the old
Panhandle National Bank during the first months of his residence here. Later he purchased the
plant of the Wichita Herald and for twenty years was the active head of that paper until his
____ compelled his retirement. In his editorial work he had a clear, vigorous style, which won
him a place in the front rank of Texas journalists. He was possessed of a warm hearted, gentile
disposition and his friends were legion. When his affliction came upon him he made a brave
fight and did not give up as long as his faculties were spared him. At his death, he was in his
fifty-third year. He is survived by a widow and two children, two brothers and two sisters. The
funeral services conducted by Dr. Mitchell at Prattville, Alabama, were held at the
Presbyterian church at 10 o'clock this morning under the auspices of the Masonic lodge, at
which the deceased was a member The body was laid to rest in the Riverside cemetery.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > August > 20

J. KENNEDY DEAD

One of the Founders of Iowa Park Called Home in his Eighty-Fourth Year.

A PROMINENT CITIZEN

Deceased Was Highly Honored in Three States and His Loss is Felt Keenly

The funeral of Judge J. Kennedy, who died at his home in Iowa Park on the evening of the 18th
occurred at that place late yesterday afternoon, the remains being laid to rest with Masonic
honors in the cemetery near that place. He was one of Wichita county's most honored and highly
esteemed citizens. He was a native of Pennsylvania, being born in Perry county in that State in
the year 1824. A greater part of his life was spent in his native state of Pennsylvania, and he
was among the prominent men of that State, having served two terms in the legislature and held
the office of internal revenue collector, and many other offices of trust. In 1878, he left
Pennsylvania for Iowa, where he turned his attention to farming and soon came into prominence
and was elected to the legislature of that State in 1884, during which time he introduced and
fathered the famous prohibition law of Iowa. In politics he was a staunch republican. In 1888
Judge Kennedy removed from Iowa to Texas and with others organized what was known as the Iowa
Texas Land Company. This company purchased several thousand acres of land about eleven miles
west of this city on the line of the "Denver" and started the town of Iowa Park. The company
brought many farmers from Iowa, Illinois and Minnesota and sold them tracts of land, and those
who purchased and held these lands are now counted wealthy. Judge Kennedy continued to make
Iowa Park his home and at the time of his death was in his 84th year. He leaves surviving him a
second wife and two children by his first wife, a son and a daughter. The latter resides in
Colorado and the former in California, neither who were present at his funeral. In the death of
Judge Kennedy, Iowa Park and Wichita county loses one of the most distinguished citizens and
throughout his long and honorable life he made his influence felt in the communities in which
he resided.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > August > 31

Wounds result fatally

L.C. Kemp succumbed to the injuries received in the accident that happened to him and W.E.
Smith two weeks ago near Harriston, Oklahoma, when they were accidentally shot by a shotgun
falling out of the buggy in which they were riding. His death occurred Thursday about noon at
his home in the north part of town, the immediate cause of his death being lockjaw. Deceased
was about 23 years of age and was a member in good standing of the M.W.A. lodge. He has been a
resident of Burkburnett for about six months and has many friends here who extend condolence to
the bereaved ones. He leaves a wife and one child to mourn his untimely death. The remains were
shipped to Whitesboro for burial. - Burkburnett Star.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > August > 31

Dick Franklyn, a young man aged 19, who has been working at the carpenter's trade in this city,
died at the home of Mrs. Willis last Saturday evening at 7 o'clock of an attack of typhoid
fever and the remains were prepared for burial and shipped to his home at Gainesville Sunday
morning.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > September > 2

Death of Mrs. J.H. Rayborn

Mrs. J.H. Rayborn, nee Miss Mary Helm, died at her home at Dundee last night. Deceased was
quite well and favorably known in this city, having for many years resided here and was a
graduate of the Wichita Falls high school and her death, coming within a year of her happy
marriage. It was a great shock to her numerous friends in this city. At this writing it is not
known at what time or place the funeral will be held. Later - At her death Mrs. Rayborn was in
her 25th year. Her marriage to Mr. Rayborn took place on the 4th of last December, and her
death was due to a complication of diseases. The funeral will take place at Dundee tomorrow
morning.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > September > 3

Death of Mrs. J.E. Burnett

A telephone message received here early this morning from Fort Worth announced the sad news of
the death of Mrs. J.E. Burnett, wife of the superintendent of the Wichita Falls Creamery and
Ice Cream Company. Her death occurred at about one o'clock this morning. Mr. Burnett was at her
bedside when death came. The four children, who were at their home here left for Fort Worth on
an early train this morning. The body will be shipped to Fort Scott, Arkansas for burial. The
news of Mrs. Burnett's death came as a shock to the friends of the family here. The immediate
cause of her death was blood poisoning. Later - The funeral of Mrs. J.H. Burnett will take
place from the family residence in this city on next Saturday. The remains will reach here in
the morning at 2:30 o'clock.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > September > 7

Obituary

Mrs. Birdie Lucille Hart Burnett was born in Fort Scott, Kansas, August 1, 1873 and died in
Fort Worth, Texas, September 3rd, 1908. Was united in marriage in Fort Scott, Kansas, Oct. 28,
1891 to James H. Burnett of Denver, Colorado, and came to Wichita Falls, Texas in September
1906. She is survived by her husband and four children, Marie, Norma May, Thelma and James Jr.
to whom she was a most devoted wife and mother. Her departure was very sudden, caused by an
operation performed in Fort Worth, Texas. She seemed to tally at first, but having a weak hear,
died suddenly. The remains were returned to Wichita Falls and the funeral took place from the
family residence, 1620 Tenth street, at 4 p.m. September 5, 1908, in the presence of a large
assembly of friends. The services were conducted by Rev. A.J. Bush of the Christian church of
which the deceased was a member in Fort Scott, Kansas. The remains were interred in the
Riverside cemetery of Wichita Falls, Texas. Mr. and Mrs. A.R. Burnett of Guthrie, Okla., Mrs.
Charles and Dexter and Mrs. William H. Ramsey of Sedalia, Mo., the parents and sisters of Mr.
J.H. Burnett, were present for the services. Mr. and Mrs. A.R. Burnett will remain in Wichita
Falls indefinitely.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > September > 10

Burial of Mrs. S.E. Ragsdale

The body of Mrs. S.E. Ragsdale, who died in Denver Monday, will reach Dallas this morning and
the funeral will be from the home of her father, James Guyton, 981 Bryan street, at 4 o'clock
this afternoon. The services will be conducted by Rev. J.L. Bell, pastor of the East Dallas
Presbyterian church, and the interment will be in Oakland. Mrs. Ragsdale was formerly Miss Lucy
Guyton, who grew up in Dallas and had a host of friends here. Mrs. R.S. Smith and W.A. Guyton
of Galveston, J.R. Guyton of Tyler and J.T. Guyton of Bayou Gouls, La, a sister and the
brothers of Mrs. Ragsdale, have arrived in the city to attend the funeral. - Dallas News Mrs.
Ragsdale was well known in Wichita Falls, where she formerly lived, her husband having formerly
been an auditor of the Wichita Valley railroad at this point.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > September > 14

For the fourth time within two months the death messenger invaded the family of J.E. McCall,
the last victim being T.C. McCall, aged about 21 years. The young man was suddenly stricken at
about 1 o'clock Saturday afternoon while stting at the dinner table of an uncle in Iowa Park,
when he was visiting whole recuperating from a long and severe illness with typhoid fever,
which was the cause of his death of three other members of the family. The immediate cause of
his death was heart trouble, which resulted from the fever. The remains were brought to this
city Sunday and were laid to rest in the Riverside cemetery.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > September > 17

Run Over By Cab In Darkness

Frank Coffield, a locomotive engineer in the employ of the Katy here, was run down by a cab at
the corner of Eighth street and Indiana avenue last night. Owing to the darkness that
prevailed, Coffield was run over before he was seen by the cab driver and not until he heard
Coffield groan did the driver know that he had struck a man. Help was summoned and Coffield was
taken to Dr. Moore's office nearby where his injuries were given attention. Coffield was badly
bruised and sustained a few cuts, but no bones were fractured and he suffered no internal
injuries. Coffield is now at his room in the Ruck's hotel, where his injuries may keep him
confined for several days.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > September > 21

Died From Injuries

As the result of an accident on Wednesday night in which he was run over by a cab at the corner
of Indiana avenue and Eighth street Frank Caulfield, a Katy engineer, died late Saturday
afternoon. His death occurred at the Wichita Falls sanitarium and was the result of internal
injuries sustained when he was run down by the cab. Caulfield's remains were taken in charge by
the Brotherhood of Locomotive Fireman, of which the deceased was a member and were embalmed and
are now at Northwest Texas Furniture and Coffin Company's undertaking rooms, awaiting word from
relatives of the deceased. Caulfield was about 55 years of age and had been in the employ of
the Katy road for nearly three years. He was a quiet sober and industrious man and had
accumulated a neat fortune, variously estimated at from $30,000 to $75,000. He was a native of
Ireland and his mother and sister living in Dublin, have been notified of his death by cable.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > September > 22

NO ONE SAW ACCIDENT

Man Believed to Have Been Attempting to Board Freight When He was Killed

Last night about 4:20, just after southbound freight No. 20 had pulled out, the body of a man
was found lying on Denver track No. 1, just opposite the freight depot. From all appearances,
he had attempted to catch the outgoing freight and missed his hold, falling between the cars
and was literally ground to pieces. The body was cut in two just above the waist line, both
hands were cut off near the wrists and from bits of clothing scattered along the track, it was
apparent that he had been dragged twenty or thirty feet. An inquest was held this morning by
Justice Brothers and from cards of various carpenters unions found on his person, among them
Tulsa, San Antonio and Beaumont, it was learned that the unfortunate man's name was Pat Taylor
and that he was about 50 years of age. No further evidence of identity was found. The body was
placed in Jackson Bros. morgue and will be interred this afternoon.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > September > 25

Death of Louis Lueke

Mr. Louis H. Lueke, who for the past three weeks has been confined to his bed with an attack of
typhoid malarial fever, died at his home in the southern part of the city at 11:55 p.m. last
night. For the past week he has been very low and his death was not a surprise to the immediate
friends of the family. Deceased was a native of Missouri and at his death was 42 years, 5
months and 14 days of age. For the past fifteen years he has been a respected citizen of this
city, following the trade of a blacksmith and carriage maker. He was an honest, upright citizen
and the widow and two children who survive him have the sympathy of all in their great sorrow,
which has deprived them of a loving husband and a kind and indulgent father. Rev. E. Deffner,
pastor of the German Lutheran church of which the deceased was a consistent member, will
conduct the funeral services from the family residence at 3:30 this afternoon. A short service
will also be held at the church, after which interment will take place at Riverside cemetery.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > September > 26

Died of Consumption

Chas. Kuykendall, Jr. a young man aged about 20 years, died this morning at the Ruck's House of
consumption. Deceased was on his way from Lancaster, Kentucky to Texico, New Mexico and had
stopped here for a few days visit to his uncle, Mr. Charles Kuykendall, 1611 10th street.
Interment will take place tomorrow at Riverside cemetery.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > October > 5

Death of Mrs. Fannie Mataska

Mrs. Fannie Mataska, aged 68 years, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. J.B. Marlow at 2:45
this morning. Funeral services will be conducted from the family residence, corner of Seventh
street and Burnet avenue, at 5 o'clock this afternoon. The family has the sympathy of a large
circle of friends in their great sorrow.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > October > 12

A.S. Fassett is Dead

One of Wichita Falls' Prominent and Wealthy Citizens Passes Away.

Last night at 11 p.m., Mr. A.S. Fassett for twenty years one of Wichita Falls most prominent
and wealthy citizens died at his room in the City National Bank block. Deceased had been a
sufferer from stomach troubles for the past two or three years and during the last two months
had been unable to leave his room. He was a native of Michagin and at his death 62 years, 5
monts and 14 dsays of age. He leaves one brother, Mr. Seth S. Fassett, and one sister, Mrs.
A.H. Tuttle, both of Van Buren county, Michigan. His brother was at his bedside at the time of
his death, and had been here for several weeks to nurse and care for him. The arrival of his
sister and brother-in-law is expected today or tomorrow. The deceased leaves an estate valued
at $100, 000 or more, principally ranch property located in this county. The remains will be
interred in the Iowa Park cemetery, but at this writing it is not known at what hour or day
imterment will take place.. Mr. Fassett had served as a member of Wichita Falls City Council
for several terms and as such made the city an honest efficient and able councilman. During his
twenty years residence in this city and county he made a host of friends. all of whom will read
with regrets this notice of his death.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > October > 13

Card of Thanks

To all those who so kindly assisted us during the illness and death of our precious mother,
Fannie Matasky, we wish to tender our sincerest thanks and appreciation, and pray God's
choicest blessings to rest upon them. Chas. Matasky Mrs. Ed Dockel Mrs. J.B. Marlow Mrs.
Kolenetz

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > October > 21

Death of J.J. Barnes

Mr. J.J. Barnes died at the home of his daughter at 8:45 this morning. At his death he was 84
years and 18 days of age. The funeral is announced to take place from the family residence
tomorrow afternoon at 4 o'clock, the services to be conducted by Rev. J.A. Stafford, pastor of
the First Methodist Church South.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > October > 23

Death of S.C. Smith

After a year's suffering with a cancer, S.C. Smith died at the home of J.J. Lory at 1211 Tenth
street at ? o'clock Thursday evening. Mr. Smith has been a resident of Wichita Falls for more
than twelve years and was held in high esteem. He was one of the organizers of the Panhandle
Implement Company, but was more recently in the employ of Alex Kahn, the clothier, being
compelled to quit work about a year ago. Mr. Smith was a native of Louisiana and at his death
was in his 49th? Year. His widow survives. The funeral service was held at the home of Mr. Lory
at 2:45 o'clock this afternoon, being conducted by Rev. W.E. Fry assisted by Rev. A.J. Bush and
Rev. J.A. Stafford. The remains were laid to rest in the Riverside Cemetery.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > October > 24

Mrs. A.S. Fonville received a message this morning, telling of the death of her brother, Dr.
H.L. Powell, at Marlin, Texas, where he had been taking treatment for rheumatism when he was
taken sick with typhoid fever from which his death resulted last night. Dr. Powell had lived in
Archer City for about two years, coming to that place from Los Angeles, California. The body is
expected to be brought here today and the funeral will take place at Archer City some time
tomorrow.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > November > 4

MILTON TERHUNE IS DEAD

Popular Assistant Cashier of First National Bank Dies at McLean

The following telegram was received this morning by Cahsier E.M. McGregor of the First National
Bank:

McLean, Tex., Nov. 4 - W.M. McGregor: Milton is dead. Will take remains to Iowa Park. Wil reach
there about noon tomorrow. Funeral services will be held tomorrow afternoon. J.A. Terhune

Milton Terhune was one of Wichita Falls most popular young men, and for the past two or three
years has held the responsible position of assistant cashier at the First National Bank in this
city. He had been in bad health for the past three or four months, and one day last week
decided to take a vacation visit. Shortly after reaching McLean, he was stricken with typhoid
fever, which caused severe hemorrhages of the lungs. But few of his friends knew of his
ailment, and his death as announced in the telegram from his father was rather shocking.
Deceased was a member of the Christian church and lived a consistent Christian life. To know
him was to be his friend, and no death that has occurred in this city for quite a while will be
read with more sorrow than this one. Before coming to Wichita Falls, he was connected with the
First National bank at Iowa Park, at which place he has resided since childhood, and where his
father now resides. Many from this city will go from here to Iowa Park tomorrow afternoon to
attend his funeral.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > November > 5

Died of Typhoid Fever

Chas. Guire, a young man who came from Alabama to this city about one month ago, died at the
home of his aunt, Mrs. Bohannon, at 1410 Fourteenth street at 6:30 this morning of an attack of
typhoid fever. Funeral services will be conducted from the Bohannon residence at 5 o'clock this
afternoon. Interment at Riverside cemetery.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > November > 16

Crushed to Death

Wm. P. Cornforth Meets With Fatal Accident in new Mexico

The body of William P. Cornforth, formerly a citizen of Wichita county, was brought to Iowa
Park this morning from St. Verain, Roosevelt county, New Mexico, where the deceased met his
death on the 14th inst while.... the rest of the article is missing

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > November > 20

Death of Mrs. D.L. Wallace

Mrs. D.L. Wallace of Electra died at the Wichita Falls sanitarium at about ? o'clock this
morning, following an operation some days ago for liver trouble. Mrs. Wallace was 47 years of
age and is survived by her husband and five children. The funeral will probably be held
tomorrow.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > December > 5

Jennie Esther is Dead

After an illness of less than two days with appendicitis, Jennie Esther Bean, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. C.W. Bean, died at the family home at 1419 Tenth Street, at 2 o'clock this morning.
The funeral service was held at the residence at 3 o'clock this afternoon and was conducted by
Rev. J.J. Dalton. The remains were laid to rest in Riverside cemetery. At her death, Jennie
Esther was 14 years, 5 months and 14 days. She was a student at St. Mary's Academy, was a girl
whose bright and sunny temperament and kind and generous heart made her a universal favorite
with not only her young companions but with those of all ages who knew her. In tier bereavement
the father and mother and the brother and sister have a sympathy from all which cannot be
expressed in words.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > December > 18

Tom Kent's Body Buried Here

The body of Tom Kent who was stricken with heart failure while attending a wedding at Boyce
Tuesday afternoon, was shipped to this city arriving at 2:30 o'clock this afternoon and was
taken from the Denver depot to Riverside cemetery where short funeral services were held. Mr.
Kent was formerly a resident of this city and was a brother of Mrs. C. B. Gorman, now living in
Ft. Worth.

Wichita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) > 1908 > December > 29

B.F. Armstrong Dead

B.F. Armstrong an aged citizen of the Groom community, was brought to Amarillo a few days since
for treatment, and died here yesterday morning. The remains were shipped yesterday afternoon to
Jolly, Texas for burial. Mr. Armstrong has been in this portion of the State for a considerable
time making his home at Groom. He formerly lived at Jolly. Monday - Amarillo Panhandle

 

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